Properties Of Integers based Mathematics Notes For CTET Exam : Free PDF

Fractions based Mathematics Notes

Mathematics is an equally important section for CTET, MPTET, KVS & DSSSB Exams and has even more abundant importance in some other exams conducted by central or state govt. Generally, there are questions asked related to basic concepts, Facts and Formulae of the Properties Of Integers.

To let you make the most of Mathematics section, we are providing important facts related to the Properties Of Integers. At least 1-2 questions are asked from this topic in most of the teaching exams. We wish you all the best of luck to come over the fear of the Mathematics section.

How to Overcome Exam Fever, Especially When You Fear Maths

Properties of Integers

Properties of addition

 

Closure Property: Let a and b be any two integers, then a + b will always be an integer. This is called the closure property of addition of integers.

Examples: (a) 7 + 3 = 10

(b) (– 3) + 6 = 3

Commutative Property: If a and b are two integers, then a + b = b + a, i.e., on changing the order of integers, we get the same result. This is called the commutative property of addition of integers.

Examples: (a) 2 + 7 = 7+2 = 9

(b) (– 3) + (12) = (12) + (– 3) = 9

Associative Property: If a, b, and c are three integers, then a + (b + c) = (a + b) + c, i.e., in the addition of integers, we get the same result, even the grouping is changed. This is called the associative property of addition of integers.

Examples : [(– 3) + (– 4)] + (8) = (– 3) + [(– 4) + 8]

(– 7) + 8 = (– 3) + 4

1 =1

 Additive identity : If zero is added to any integer, the value of integer does not change. If ‘a’ is an integer, then a + 0 = a = 0 + a. Hence, zero is called the additive identity of integers. Examples :

(a) 12 + 0 = 12 = 0 + 12

(b) (– 3) + 0 = (– 3) = 0 +(– 3)

Additive Inverse : When an integer is added to its opposite, we get the result as zero  (additive identity). If a is an integer, then (– a) is its opposite (or vice– versa) such that

a + (– a) = 0 = (– a) + a

Thus, an integer and its opposite are called the additive inverse of each other.

Examples: 2 +(– 2) = 0 = (– 2) + 2

Property of 1: Addition of 1 to any integer gives its successor.

Examples: 7+ 1 = 8

Hence, 8 is the successor of 7.

– 5 + 1 = (– 4)

Hence, (– 4) is the successor of (– 5).

Properties of subtraction

 

Closure Property: If a and b are two integers, then a – b will always be an integer. This is called the closure property of subtraction of integers.

Examples: (a) 3 – 7 = – 4

(b) (– 5) – (– 6) = 1

Commutative Property: If a and b are two integers, then a – b b – a, i.e., commutative property does not hold good for the subtraction of integers.

Examples: 7– (– 8) = 15 but (– 8) – 7 = – 15

3 – 4 = – 1 but 4 – 3 = 1

Hence, subtraction of integers is not commutative.

Associative Property: If a, b and c are three integers, then (a – b) – C a – (b – c), i.e., associative property does not hold good for the subtraction of integers.

Example: (8– 4) – 2 8 – (4 – 2)

4 – 2 8– 2

2 6

Hence, subtraction of integers is not associative.

Property of Zero: When zero is subtracted from an integer, we get the same integer, i.e., a– 0 = a, where ‘a’ is an integer.

Examples: (a) 6– 0 = 6

(b) (– 6) – 0 = (– 6)

Property of 1: Subtraction of 1 from any integer gives its predecessor.

Examples

(a) 7– 1 = 6     (6 is predecessor of 7.)

(b) (– 3) – 1 = (– 4) [(– 4) is predecessor of (– 3).]

Properties of multiplication

 

Closure Property: If a and b are two integers then a × b will also be an integer. This is called the closure property of multiplication of integers.

Examples: (a) 3 × (– 4) = (– 12)

(b) (– 7) (– 2) = 14

Commutative Property: If a and b are two integers, then a × b=b × a, i.e., on changing the order of integers, we get the same result. This is called the commutative property of multiplication of integers.

Examples: (a) 7 × 2 = 2 × 7 = 14

(b) (– 3) × (– 7) = (– 7) × (– 3) = 21

Thus, commutative property holds good for the multiplication of integers.

Associative Property: If a, b and c are three integers, then a × (b × c) = (a × b) × c. This is called the associative property of multiplication of integers.

Examples: (3 × 4) × 5 = 3 × (4 × 5)

12 × 5 = 3 × 20

60 = 60

Thus, associative property holds good for the multiplication of integers.

Multiplicative Identity: The product of any integer and 1 gives the same integer. If ‘a’ is an integer, then a × 1 = a = 1 × a.

Hence, 1 is called the multiplicative identity.

Examples: (a) 7 × 1 = 1 × 7 = 7

(a) (– 3) × 1 = 1 × (– 3) = (– 3)

Multiplicative Inverse: The product of any integer and its reciprocal gives the result as 1 (multiplicative identity). If ‘a’ is an integer, then a ×  = 1 =  × a. Thus, an integer and its reciprocal are called the multiplicative inverse of each other.

Examples: (a) 3 ×

(b) (-5) ×  = 1 =

Property of Zero : The product of any integer and zero gives the result as zero. If ‘a’ is an integer, then a × 0 = 0 × a = 0.

Examples : 6 × 0 = 0 × 6 = 0

Distributive Property: Multiplication distributes over addition. If a, b, and c are three integers, then a × (b + c) = ab + ac. This is called the distributive property of multiplication of integers.

Examples : (– 7) × [3 + (– 4)] = (– 7) (3) + (– 7) × (– 4)

(– 7) × (– 1) = (– 21) + 28

7 = 7

Properties of division

 

Closure Property: Closure property does not hold good for division of integers.

Examples: 12 ÷ 3 = 4 (4 is an integer.)

Commutative Property: If a and b are two integers, then a ÷ b b ÷ a.

Examples: (a) 4 ÷ 2 = 2 but 2 ÷ 4 =

(b) (-3) ÷ 1 = -3 but 1 ÷ (-3) =

Associative Property : If a, b, c are three integers, then (a ÷ b) + c a ÷ (b ÷ c)

Example : (24 ÷ 4) ÷ (– 2) 24 ÷ [4 ÷ (– 2)]

6 ÷ (– 2) 24 ÷ (– 2)

(– 3) (–12)

Property of Zero : When zero is divided by any integer, the result is always zero. If a is and integer, then 0 ÷ a = 0.

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